This year's conference is fully virtual.

Registration is now open. Register before August 20, 11:59 pm EST.

Choose a theme to glance at the program

• EST •

10:30 - 11:15

Social Event

Virtual House of Commons Tour and Table Officer Q&A

What do 
     •Susan Kulba, Director General and Executive Architect, Real Property Directorate, House of Commons
     •Yassine Aouididi, Manager, Service Content Monitoring and Delivery, House of Commons. and 
     •Jennifer Garrett, Director General, Centre Block Program, Public Services and Procurement Canada

have in common?  They will be our guests panelists discussing the House of Commons extensive rehabilitation project.

Join our three experts as they enlighten the audience with the role of the House of Commons in democracy.  They will thrill you with details of the Centre Block rehabilitation project.  There will be behind the scenes videos, insider insights and the opportunity to ask your burning questions about the temporary House of Commons chamber in West Block.  They will share their insight as they discuss the business and procedural adaptions by the House of Commons in response to the Centre Block rehabilitation and the pandemic.

Start off the IPAC 2021 National Conference on the right foot with this can't-miss discussion!

Moderator: Dave Boutin

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11:30 - 11:45

OPENING CEREMONIES

Blessing and Welcoming remarks

11:45 - 12:15

KEYNOTE

A tête a tête with former Governor General, Rt. Hon. David Johnston, PC moderated by Shannon Lindquist.

Find more here.

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Trust and Government - A tête-à-tête with former Governor General, the Rt. Hon. David Johnston

13:00 - 13:15

HEALTH BREAK

IPAC Awards

13:15 - 14:15

BREAKOUT SESSIONS

A Tale of Two Populations: On Cities, Urban-Rural Issues and Inclusive Recoveries

Is Canada an urban nation or a rural nation - or both?  Looking at population density, most Canadians live in cities, but a glance at our geography reveals a largely rural and remote landscape. Throughout our history, this feature has created a divergence of values in the midst of a convergence of economic opportunity and cultural connectedness. Are we growing apart as a nation or is there more that binds us than we might initially consider? What impact does this have for public servants and policy creation, and what other considerations must be taken into account as communities across Canada and around the world recover from the pandemic? Join a distinguished panel of municipal policy experts for a discussion on the evolving relationship between urban and rural populations.

Online, all the time: Canadians’ Appetite for Digital Government Services

Globally, Canadians’ historically strong adoption of all things digital has paved the way for an advanced and varied digital offer across governments of all levels in Canada. And, and Canadians continue to live digital lives - using digital tools for everything from banking, to shopping and even social relationships. Governments are challenged to keep pace, and deliver services that have the functionality and features our publics expect. Are government efforts aligning with the appetites of Canadians? Are we ahead of the curve or behind it? Our panel will share their perspectives and open the floor for your experiences in this highly interactive session.

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The Transformation of Work: Skills and Workplace of the Future

Over the last several years, new technologies began to transform the world of work. The last year in particular has accelerated new modes of work, such as telework/remote working and the use of new virtual tools. Examine how the world of work is changing, from the working environment itself to the competencies that will be required in the future, and to the changes that we can expect for the long-term. Our three public sector experts will each speak to a different time horizon - present, past and future. Join us on this journey in time! 

14:15 - 14:30

HEALTH BREAK

IPAC Awards

14:30 - 15:30

BREAKOUT SESSIONS

Policy and Decision-Making in the Public Service: Will this be the new ‘Roaring 20s’?

Emerging from the Spanish flu pandemic and World War 1, the 1920s ushered in an era of rapid technological change, an economic boom and a rapid evolution in social norms. The last eighteen months have similarly changed our economy, Canadians' expectations of our government and ourselves, and tested our institutions. As we have seen an increased prominence of government in Canadians’ daily lives, what impact will this have after the pandemic – both as we enter a period of economic recovery and moving forward longer term? Will the pandemic cause a longer term shift in the role government plays in citizens’ lives, or in the economy? During the pandemic, governments took on new forms of policy making, opened up new dialogues with the public, made activist economic choices, and designed new processes for service delivery. Along the way, many aspects of the public service were re-imagined and re-designed. Which aspects are here to stay? Which will we cast aside as temporary? Is there an opportunity to fundamentally reshape the public service in Canada and abroad and how do elections influence the discussion? This panel dives into these questions (and more) with an assembled group of experts on policy-making and governance

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Cultivating Human Centred Leadership

What does it mean to be a human-centered leader? As we look towards the future of work, human-centered leadership is more important than ever before. Delve into the role leaders play in advancing efforts to combat systemic racism and oppression, and support employees through empathic, honest and transparent leadership.

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15:30 - 16:15

David McLaughlin (Manitoba); Laura Lee Langley (Nova Scotia); Cheryl Hansen (New Brunswick); Georgina Black (Deloitte)

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16:15 - 16:30

DAY ONE CLOSING REMARKS

Vanier Medal Presentation - Fireside Chat with Yaprak Baltacioğlu

16:30 - 17:00

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

IPAC Members Only

17:00 - 18:15

SOCIAL EVENT

Bhangra Dancing with Gurdeep Pandher of Yukon

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The first 50 delegates to sign up will receive a special participation treat to join Sourtoe Captain Adam Gerle, Gurdeep of the Yukon and Jennifer of the Yukon Convention Bureau in a special Yukon ‘Toe-st’ during a beverage break on Monday, August 23 at the 5:00pm EST Social Event: Bhangra Dancing with Gurdeep Pandher of Yukon.

 

Ingredients: Yukon Haskap Berries, Sugar, Glucose, Gelatin,Citric Acid

 
 

Includes a one-year IPAC membership.

• EST •

10:30 - 11:15

Social Event

Pow Wow Workout with Amanda Fox

11:30 - 11:45

OPENING REMARKS

12:30 - 12:45

HEALTH BREAK

Presentation of IPAC-IBM Innovative Management Awards

12:45 - 13:45

BREAKOUT SESSIONS

Implementation of Truth and Reconciliation Call to Action #57

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission`s Call to Action #57 calls upon federal, provincial, territorial and municipal governments to provide education to public servants on the history of Indigenous peoples, including the history and legacy of residential schools, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Treaties, and Indigenous rights, Indigenous law and Indigenous-Crown relations. The call noted the need for skills-based training in intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights and anti-racism among public servants at all levels.

What does this call to action look like in practice? How are governments and public servants responding? This panel discussion will address the steps necessary to effectively implement this call, aimed for public servants to educate themselves on the true histories and cultures of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples. Panelists will share insights on the progress of the implementation of TRC Call to Action #57 that may further inform actions for all public servants. 

Service Delivery in the Digital Economy

Digital has become an economic driver, challenging governments to quickly adopt innovative service, regulatory and policy approaches to meet citizens evolving expectations. Digital service delivery has created faster, more efficient ways to engage with citizens and deliver services. However, the success of these tools also opens expectations regarding speed of service, ease of access, privacy and control among others.  This session will cover policy and service delivery approaches that maximize social & economic benefits.

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Supporting Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in the Public Service

Recent events have crystalized the need to continue to actively build an enabled workforce, based firmly on our shared values of equity, inclusion and merit, and committed to taking meaningful action on anti-racism, accessibility and mental health. This panel examines how the pandemic has enabled us to take the first steps to creating a more inclusive future of work for public servants as it relates to race, gender, physical ability and other identity factors.

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13:45 - 14:00

HEALTH BREAK

IPAC Awards

14:00 - 15:00

BREAKOUT SESSIONS

Emerging Tech: Embracing the Opportunities, Managing the Risks.

Digital tools provide both governments and the public with new ways to work and interact. Emerging technology can improve Canadians’ lives, making services more accessible, safer, and easier to use. New technologies and approaches also carry risks that must be managed for successful use, including data government and privacy. How can the right balance between harnessing new technologies and managing the risks be achieved? This panel bring together leading thinkers on digital government, emerging technology and privacy to discuss the tension inherent to this space.

Davis_Pier.png

Since June 2019, IPAC has led a series of round-table discussions focused on deepening the understanding of all elements of systemic racism in Canada, including within the public service, via dialogue with a diversity of communities. In this session, Dr. Cindy Blackstock, child protection and Indigenous children's rights advocate, and Dr. Myrna Lashley, expert in the intersection of policing, cultural competency and citizen interaction, will shine a light on where we are today, how we can amplify our commitment to diversity and inclusion, and how best to work together to create a better future for all. 

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15:00 - 15:45

KEYNOTE

Join Canada’s top civil servant as she shares how the various, unprecedented challenges of the past year and a half are now helping to accelerate the move to a more diverse, inclusive and agile public service.

Janice Charette, Interim Clerk of the Privy Council

15:45 - 16:00

ipac awards

16:00 - 16:15

closing ceremony

Passing the torch to IPAC 2022

Closing Remarks

16:15 - 17:00

NETWORKING

17:00 - 18:15

SOCIAL EVENT

Join Yaprak as she takes you from Instagram into her kitchen, sharing her passion for cooking. Grab your favourite beverage and get ready to learn how to prepare home-cooked meals from the comfort of your own home.  All levels of home cooks welcome and encouraged!

Recipe

Cooking Demonstration with Vanier Medal Winner Yaprak Baltacioğlu

Winding Roads
 
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Alicia Aragutak
Executive Director, Regional Recovery Center and 2020 Indspire Inuit Youth Award laureate
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Alana Robert
Associate, Litigation Group, McCarthy Tetrault and 2020 Indspire Métis Youth Laureate
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Reconciliation with First Nations, Inuit and Métis Peoples

Meeting the goals of reconciliation with Indigenous peoples is a responsibility of all Canadians: as individuals; as leaders across public, business and community sectors; and notably, for those involved in the public service. Federal, provincial, territorial and municipal governments have acknowledged the need to redress the legacy of residential schools and advance the process of reconciliation, yet progress has been mixed. In the opening plenary of the theme of Reconciliation with First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples, Gina Wilson, IPAC 2021’s Honourary Co-Chair and Federal Deputy Minister for Diversity and Inclusion and Youth, leads a conversation with International Chief and Elder Dr. Wilton Littlechild, Alicia Aragutak (Executive Director, Regional Recovery Centre and 2020 Indspire Inuit Youth Award laureate) and Alana Robert (Associate, Litigation Group, McCarthy Tetrault and 2020 Indspire Métis Youth laureate) on what reconciliation entails, the role Canadians must continue to play to advance its progress, and the path ahead.

Gina Wilson
Honourary Co-Chair, IPAC 2021 and Deputy Minister, Diversity and Inclusion and Youth, Canadian Heritage
Moderator
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Wilton Littlechild
Honorary Chief for the Maskwacis Cree, International Chief for Treaty 6
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Michael DeGagné
President and CEO, Indspire 
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Jessica Wood
Assistant Deputy Minister for the Reconciliation Transformation and Strategies Division with the Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation, Government of British Columbia
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What Does Reconciliation Mean and How Can It Shape the Public Service?

In an era of reconciliation, governments and public institutions have committed to working differently with Indigenous peoples, governments, and institutions. Advancing reconciliation demands that governments move beyond doing business as usual. Public servants are critical to realizing a more just and equitable vision of Canada for Indigenous peoples. In this panel discussion moderated by Ry Moran (University of Victoria - Associate University Librarian, Reconciliation), Jessica Wood (Assistant Deputy Minister, Reconciliation Transformation and Strategies Division, British Columbia Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation), Mike DeGagné (President and CEO, Indspire), and Anna Fontaine (Visiting Executive, Indigenous Knowledge Circle, Diversity and Youth and Inclusion, Canadian Heritage) discuss the change, supports and tools public servants require if we are to move beyond the challenges of the past and achieve a brighter future in Canada for First Nation, Inuit and Métis people and communities.

Ry Moran
Associate University Librarian – Reconciliation, University of Victoria
Moderator
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Kelly Lendsay
President and CEO, Indigenous Works
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Madeleine Redfern
Chief Operating Officer, CanArctic Inuit Networks
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Building a Strong Indigenous Workforce

In an era of reconciliation, building an inclusive workforce is paramount. Our economy is stronger when it incorporates the full diversity of experience, thoughts and skills among individuals with equitable participation of all communities. What needs to be done to achieve this goal? How can public servants support this mission? In this panel discussion moderated by Samantha White (Human Resources Advisor, ESDC), Kelly Lendsay (President and CEO, Indigenous Works), Madeleine Redfern (Chief Operating Officer, CanArtic Inuit Networks) and Cynthia Welsey-Esquimaux (Chair of Truth and Reconciliation, Lakehead University) dive into these questions and discuss strategies for inclusion, diversity, skill building and development in our workforce and in the workplace.

Samantha White
HR Advisor, Workforce Strategies, Indigenous; Employment and Social Development Canada 
Moderator
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Cynthia Welsey-Esquimaux Chair on Truth and Reconciliation, Lakehead University
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​Nancy Harris
DG of Indigenous Learning at the Canada School of Public Service
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Nicholas Ng-A-Fook
Vice Dean,
Graduate Studies and Professor, University of Ottawa
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Implementation of TRC #57.What does it look like? How can I contribute?

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission`s Call to Action #57 calls upon federal, provincial, territorial and municipal governments to provide education to public servants on the history of Indigenous peoples, including the history and legacy of residential schools, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Treaties, and Indigenous rights, Indigenous law and Indigenous-Crown relations. The call noted the need for skills-based training in intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights and anti-racism among public servants at all levels.

 

What does this call to action look like in practice? How are governments and public servants responding? This panel discussion will address the steps necessary to effectively implement this call, aimed for public servants to educate themselves on the true histories and cultures of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples. Panelists will share insights on the progress of the implementation of TRC Call to Action #57 that may further inform actions for all public servants.

Caitlin Tolley
Legal Counsel, Indigenous Justice Division, Government of Ontario
Moderator
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Karen Drake
Associate Dean (Students) and Associate Professor, Osgood School of Law, York University
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TRC Calls for Action

After exploring the reconciliation stream and understanding how it can shape the public service, the importance of a strong Indigenous workforce and key elements of implementation this finale session will shed light on key themes highlighted throughout the conference as we dive into co-creation on the Calls to Action. Key themes explored will include tangible takeaways on how to collaborate around call to action #57 and how you can effectively work with key stakeholders in the public service.

Moderator
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​Raymond Frogner
Head of Archives, National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation, University of Manitoba
Brenda L. Gunn
Associate Professor Robson Hall Faculty of Law,
University of Manitoba
Valérie Gideon
Associate Deputy Minister, Indigenous Services Canada
Aimée Craft
Associate Professor,
University of Ottawa
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Glass Buildings
 
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Patrick Borbey
President, Public Service Commission of Canada
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Natalie Kahalé
 
Director, Service Transformation, City of Ottawa
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Dr. Steffen Christensen

Senior Foresight Analyst,

Policy Horizons

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Jean-François Caty

Senior Innovation Officer (South Korea & Israel),

Global Affairs Canada

The Transformation of Work: Skills and Workplace of the Future

Over the last several years, new technologies began to transform the world of work. The last year in particular has accelerated new modes of work, such as telework/remote working and the use of new virtual tools. With the assistance of our expert panel, we will seek to examine how the world of work is changing, from the working environment itself to the competencies that will be required in the future, and to the changes that we can expect for the long-term. Our three public sector experts will each speak to a different time horizon - present, past and future. We hope you join us on this journey in time! 

Moderated by
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Caroline Xavier
Associate Deputy Minister, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
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April Howe
Senior Executive Advisor, Ministry of Justice, Nova Scotia
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Susan Coward
 
Manager, RECOVER Urban Wellbeing, City of Edmonton
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Mary Larson
Partner, MNP
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Cultivating Human Centered Leadership

What does it mean to be a human-centered leader? As we look towards the future of work, human-centered leadership is more important than ever before. This session will stimulate a conversation between public sector leaders on the value of a human-centred approach to leadership in the public service, especially during crisis situations. We will delve into the role leaders play in advancing efforts to combat systemic racism and oppression, and support employees through empathic, honest and transparent leadership. And how leaders can cultivate resilient and mentally healthy workplaces and organizations.

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Carole Mendonca
Senior Manager, Deloitte Accessibility
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Julianna Rowsell
Inclusive Design Advisor and Accessibility Lead at Shared Services Canada
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Patrice Njoh
Leader, Change Management and Diversity, Equity and Inclusion  Deloitte Canada
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Denis Skinner

Executive Director of Digital Change,

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

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Deloitte_logo.png

Supporting Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in the Public Service

Recent events have crystalized the need to continue to actively build an enabled workforce,  based firmly on our shared values of equity, inclusion and merit, and committed to taking meaningful action on anti-racism, accessibility and mental health. This panel examines how the pandemic has enabled us to take the first steps to creating a more inclusive future of work for public servants as it relates to race, gender, physical ability and other identity factors. This session will stimulate a conversation among public sector thought-leaders about how education, technology and new practices and policies can serve to enable (or hinder) the advancement of a more inclusive workplace for all, while respecting the unique and diverse needs related to identity factors such as race, gender and physical ability.  

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Dr. Myrna Lashley
Professor, Department of Psychiatry, McGill University
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Daniel Quan Watson
Deputy Minister at Government of Canada Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs
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Dave Bulmer

Challenging Systemic Racism: Acting Now for the Canada of Tomorrow

Since June 2019, IPAC has led a series of round-table discussions focused on deepening the understanding of all elements of systemic racism in Canada, including within the public service, via dialogue with a diversity of communities. In this session, Dr. Cindy Blackstock, child protection and Indigenous children's rights advocate, and Dr. Myrna Lashley, expert in the intersection of policing, cultural competency and citizen interaction, will shine a light on where we are today, how we can amplify our commitment to diversity and inclusion, and how best to work together to create a better future for all. 

 
 
 
 
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Sheriff Abdou
Director General of the Integrated Service Coordination Center (ISCC), Employment and Social Development Canada
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Karen Butler
Director General, Digital Services Directorate, Canada Revenue Agency
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Elodie Bouneau
Executive Director of Platform Products, Canadian Digital Service
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Anna Leon
Partner,
KPMG
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Online, all the time: Canadians’ Appetite for Digital Government Services

Globally, Canadians’ historically strong adoption of all things digital has paved the way for an advanced and varied digital offer across governments of all levels in Canada. And, and Canadians continue to live digital lives - using digital tools for everything from banking, to shopping and even social relationships. Governments are challenged to keep pace, and deliver services that have the functionality and features our publics expect. Are government efforts aligning with the appetites of Canadians? Are we ahead of the curve or behind it? Our panel will share their perspectives and open the floor for your experiences in this highly interactive session.

  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
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Sue Paish
Chief Executive Officer, Canada’s Digital Technology Supercluster
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Navroop K Sahdev
Founder and CEO, The Digital Economist
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Hillary Hartley
Chief Digital Officer, Government of Ontario
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Mike Semansky

Lead, Strategy and Public Affairs,

D2L

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Service Delivery in the Digital Economy 

Digital has become an economic driver, challenging governments to quickly adopt innovative service, regulatory and policy approaches to meet citizens evolving expectations. Digital service delivery has created faster, more efficient ways to engage with citizens and deliver services. However, the success of these tools also opens expectations regarding speed of service, ease of access, privacy and control among others.  This session will cover policy and service delivery approaches that maximize social & economic benefits.

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Jaimie Boyd
Chief Digital Officer, Government of BC
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Ott Velsberg
Chief Data Officer,
Estonian government
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Jacqueline Lu
Data Lead, Mozilla
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Jerrett Myers
Principal,
Davis Pier
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Emerging Tech: Embracing the Opportunities, Managing the Risks

Digital tools provide both governments and the public with new ways to work and interact. Emerging technology can improve Canadians’ lives, making services more accessible, safer, and easier to use. New technologies and approaches also carry risks that must be managed for successful use, including data government and privacy. How can the right balance between harnessing new technologies and managing the risks be achieved? This panel bring together leading thinkers on digital government, emerging technology and privacy to discuss the tension inherent to this space.

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Sara Hatef
Senior Service Design Consultant, Ontario Ministry of Government and Consumer Services
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Varina Cowalchuk
Service Design,
Deloitte Digital
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Doug Logan
Senior Digital Service Designer and Strategist,
Deloitte Digital
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Design Thinking in Action

More than ever, public institutions and entities need to be able to adapt and respond quickly to an ever changing and complex environment and context. Design is a systematic way of navigating within uncertainty and ambiguity and developing solutions that hit the needs of your target groups and users. Embracing a new way of thinking about public service delivery, program design and policy creation, design principles can help public servants navigate complex challenges emerging everyday in their working lives. This panel will help public servants understand the basics of design, recognize challenges and barriers when practicing design thinking and provide a practical road map for design implementation in your organization. 

 
 
 
 
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Steve Willis
General Manager of the City of Ottawa’s Planning, Infrastructure and Economic Development Department
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Carole Saab
Chief Executive Officer, Federation of Canadian Municipalities
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André Juneau

Member, Board of Governors,

University of Ottawa

Is Canada an urban nation? Or a rural nation? Or both?  Looking at population density, most Canadians live in cities, but a glance at our geography reveals a largely rural and remote landscape. Throughout our history, this feature has created a divergence of values in the midst of a convergence of economic opportunity and cultural connectedness. Are we growing apart as a nation or is there more that binds us than we might initially consider? What impact does this have for public servants and policy creation, and what other considerations must be taken into account as communities across Canada and around the world recover from the pandemic? Join a distinguished panel of municipal policy experts for a discussion on the evolving relationship between urban and rural populations. 

A Tale of Two Populations: On Cities, Urban-Rural Issues and Inclusive Recoveries

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Roger Epp

Professor, Faculty of Arts,

Political Science Dept

 
 
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Neil Bouwer
Vice President,
Canada School of Public Service
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Nitika Agarwal
Chief Operating Officer and founding team member,
Apolitical
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Tara Holland

Principal
Global Government Practice, SAS Institute

Emerging from the Spanish flu pandemic and World War 1, the 1920s ushered in an era of rapid technological change, an economic boom and a rapid evolution in social norms. The last eighteen months have similarly changed our economy, Canadians' expectations of our government and ourselves, and tested our institutions. As we have seen an increased prominence of government in Canadians’ daily lives, what impact will this have after the pandemic – both as we enter a period of economic recovery and moving forward longer term? Will the pandemic cause a longer term shift in the role government plays in citizens’ lives, or in the economy? During the pandemic, governments took on new forms of policy making, opened up new dialogues with the public, made activist economic choices, and designed new processes for service delivery. Along the way, many aspects of the public service were re-imagined and re-designed. Which aspects are here to stay? Which will we cast aside as temporary? Is there an opportunity to fundamentally reshape the public service in Canada and abroad and how do elections influence the discussion? This panel dives into these questions (and more) with an assembled group of experts on policy-making and governance

Policy and Decision-Making in the Public Service: Will this be the New ‘Roaring 20s’? 

SAS_logo.png
Jeff_Moore.jpg
Jeff Moore

Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, Diversity Inclusion and Anti-Racism at Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada

 
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Sahir Khan
Executive Vice-President, The Institute of Fiscal Studies and Democracy
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Louise Levonian
Executive Director for Canada, Ireland and the Caribbean, International Monetary Fund
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Scott Thompson

Deputy Minister, Finance, Government of Yukon

For most Canadians, and even for many public servants, the creation of a government budget is a complex and often mysterious process. How funding is allocated to certain priorities and not others, why governments decide to run deficits or surpluses, and what a budget document says about a government’s priorities are often challenging to understand. Pandemic spending has resulted in new pressures on public finances. Join our expert group of “ballers” and “shot-callers”, or spenders and guardians, to demystify the process and shed light on how governments save, spend and allocate billions to projects every year. In this case, though, unlike the common “Benjamins” refrain (updated to “Bordens” for Canada), it’s not all about the money – it’s about the policy and political processes involved.

Demystifying Budget Processes: Is it Not All About the Benjamins (Or Bordens)?

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Greg Richards

Director, Executive MBA and Vice-Dean (Graduate Programs), Telfer School of Management, University of Ottawa

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Mary W. Rowe
President and CEO,
Canadian Urban Institute
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Peter Loewen
Associate Director, Global Engagement, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto
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Toby Fyfe

President and CEO,
Institute on Governance

The COVID-19 pandemic tested Canada’s institutions like never before. Keeping Canadians healthy and safe while planning for a post-pandemic economic recovery has required unprecedented cooperation between governments. With each order of government holding unique responsibility in both policy action and financial capacity, the extent of this cooperation and its future prospects as the pandemic fades from memory is worth examining more deeply. What does the future hold for Canadian federalism? Join an expert panel, includingSunil Johal. Special Advisor to the Deputy Minister of Employment and Social Development Canada l, Peter Loewen, University of Toronto Political Scientist and Toby Fyfe, CEO of the Institute on Governance, to dig into the state and future prospects of inter-governmental relations and multi-level governance during and after the pandemic.

Coming Together, or Falling Apart? Perspectives on Canada’s Pandemic Response and Relations between Federal, Provincial and Local Governments

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Sunil Johal

Special Advisor to the Deputy Minister of Employment and
Social Development Canada

 
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Deb Matthews
Former Deputy Premier,
Province of Ontario
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Jared Wesley
Associate professor of political science,
University of Alberta
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John Parisella

Senior Advisor, Business Outreach, NATIONAL Public Relations

The political-public service interface can sometimes be difficult to navigate. Aligning departmental work plans with the priorities and mandate of a minister, government, or city council can be a highly complex and dynamic process. The relationship between non-partisan public servants and duly elected politicians relies upon clear communication and a common understanding of purpose. What are the key dynamics at play in the relationship between public servants and political staff? What are some best practices in effectively working together to deliver results for Canadians? This panel brings together experts with backgrounds in politics, the public service, and academia for an insightful, informative, and pragmatic, discussion on how to build meaningful and effective working relationships in government.

Yes, Maybe, Minister: Improving the Political and Public Service Relationships to Better Serve Canadians

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Kevin Page

Founding President and Chief Executive Officer of the Institute of Fiscal Studies and Democracy University of Ottawa

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Sabreena Delhon

Executive Director,

The Samara Centre for Democracy